HomeDIY CraftSazerac - A Beautiful Mess

Sazerac – A Beautiful Mess


Learn how to make the official cocktail of New Orleans. This drink is the cousin of the Old Fashioned and is traditionally mixed with rye whiskey or brandy, bitters, sugar and absinthe. This drink dates back to 1838, and the cocktail itself was registered as a trademark in 1900 by the Sazerac company.

Learning the proper Sazerac recipe at home is a classy move. You will love this timeless drink rich in history.

Classic Cocktails: Manhattan, Gimlet, Army & Navy, Bee’s Knees, Sidecar, Cosmo, Boulevardier, Rusty Nail, Negroni.

ingredients

  • Absinthe – To rinse.
  • Sugar cube While the classic recipe requires a Sugar cubeYou’re also welcome to use simple syrup if you have it on hand.
  • Cold water – You will need half a teaspoon of cold water to dissolve the sugar cube.
  • Peter Beechaud – traditional Bitter cocktail.
  • Rye whiskey – Or alternatively, cognac.
  • Lemon peel -For decoration.

The best glassware option for serving Sazerac is a small one Old fashioned glass. Since this drink is served without ice, a smaller rocks glass is the perfect choice.

What does a sazerac taste like?

The Sazerac cocktail is a strong, robust whiskey cocktail, with a hint of flavour Of cloves, vanilla, anise, pepper and soft notes of candied spices and citrus. The finish is smooth with hints of licorice. This drink is a classic and a must try for whiskey lovers.

directions

Start by rinsing the inside of your chilled rocks glass with absinthe. Make sure to coat every part of the inside of the glass, then shake out any excess absinthe in the glass. Set aside the rinsed absinthe glass.

Next, in the bottom of a mixing cup, mix the water, sugar cube and 4 pinches of Peychaud’s jam together. Stir until the sugar cube is crushed and mostly dissolved.

Add the rye whiskey and ice and stir for about 15 seconds until well chilled.

Strain into your prepared glass.

Finally, drape the outside of the lemon peel over your drink and around the rim to express the lemon oil. Then use the lemon peel to garnish your drink either on the side of the glass or as a cocktail wrench.

Tips for making

  • To prepare this drink properly, you should never shake it in a cocktail shaker. Sazerac should never be served with ice cubes as this may dilute your drink.
  • Don’t put lemon peel in your drink; Hang it over the rim or use a cocktail pick like we did to garnish the drink.
  • Since this drink does not contain any ice, a rocks glass that is on the smaller side (like the glass used for scotch) is a great choice for glassware.

Alternatives

  • Bourbon -For a sweeter drink (more like an Old Fashioned), you can replace the rye whiskey with bourbon.
  • cognac – Try substituting the rye whiskey for cognac for a taste of the historical authentic version of this recipe. Some people prefer to split the Cognac and rye into halves and halves as well.
  • Herbsent – Many people like to use this anise-flavored drink to make Old Sazerac. During the 1930s, it was used as a substitute for absinthe.

date

The first Sazerac was blended with French brandy (Sazerac de Forge et Fils Cognac) and over time the main ingredient evolved into rye whisky. The first Sazerac was created by Antoine Amédée Péchaud, a pharmacist from Saint-Domingue, which was a French colony in what is now known as Haiti. Peychaud moved to New Orleans to open a drugstore that sold several things, including his namesake product, Peychaud’s Bitters.

Like many cocktail history lessons, Peychaud originally marketed his bitters as a medicinal remedy. He then began combining it with brandy, sugar, and water, then sold the elixir as a treatment. Healthy or not, the recipe has gained so much popularity that it has become the modern Sazerac cocktail.

Around 1885, after a phylloxera epidemic in Europe devastated French vineyards, Peychaud began replacing brandy with rye whisky. The rest, as they say, is history.

This drink was made famous at a saloon (or “café” as it was referred to at the time) called the Sazerac House in New Orleans. Historically, it was a men’s only club that opened in 1852. Today, you can still visit the famous bar Sazerac House in New Orleans and order this drink.

Instructions

Frequently asked questions

What is the difference between a Sazerac and an Old Fashioned?

While both drinks are sweetened with sugar and contain bitters, the Sazerac has a rye whiskey base, while the Old Fashioned has a bourbon base. The wash of absinthe also sets Sazerac apart.

Should Sazerac use cognac or whiskey?

Modern Sazarac recipes use rye whisky, while historical recipes before 1930 use cognac or brandy. Either option is interesting and we recommend trying both to compare.

Why was the Sazerac famous?

The Sazerac became the official cocktail of New Orleans in 2008 (and had been unofficially so for decades before that). Many claim that the Sazerac is the oldest American cocktail. It’s a big part of New Orleans’ cocktail culture and history.

More recipes to try:

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Learn how to make the classic New Orleans Sazerac cocktail at home.

fruit 1 cocktail

to equip 3 minutes

directions

  • Start by rinsing the inside of your chilled rocks glass with absinthe. Make sure to coat every part of the inside of the glass, then shake out any excess absinthe in the glass. Set aside the rinsed absinthe glass.

  • Next, at the bottom of a mixing cup, combine the water, sugar cube and 4 dashes of Péchaud. Stir until the sugar cube is crushed and mostly dissolved.

  • Add the rye whiskey and ice and stir for about 15 seconds until well chilled.

  • Strain into your prepared glass.

  • Finally, drape the outside of the lemon peel over your drink and around the rim to express the lemon oil. Then use the lemon peel to garnish your drink either on the side of the glass or as a cocktail wrench.

Notes

  • To prepare this drink properly, you should never shake it in a cocktail shaker. Sazerac should never be served with ice cubes as this may dilute your drink.
  • Don’t put lemon peel in your drink; Hang it over the rim or use a cocktail pick like we did to garnish the drink.
  • Since this drink does not contain any ice, a rocks glass that is on the smaller side (like the glass used for scotch) is a great choice for glassware.

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Nutritional facts

Sazerac

Amount per service

% daily value*

*Percent Daily Values ​​are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Note: Nutrition is automatically calculated using Spoonacular, for your convenience. Where appropriate, we recommend using your own nutrition calculations.



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